Summer Heat is Here!

With summer bringing the heat, everyone needs to know how to stay cool. Whether you’re in the best shape of your life, or you’ve been on 65+ trips around the sun. Here are a few helpful tips from the CDC on how to take care of yourself during a heat wave!

  • There were an estimated 7,415 deaths due to heat-related circumstances from 1999 to 2010.
  • The CDC states that these heat-related deaths are preventable, if you following these simple precautions.

You need to make sure to:

  1. Stay cool. Even if that means stopping what you are doing and finding a spot to cool off slowly. If you cool off to quickly, you could send your body into shock from a sudden temperature change.
  2. Remain hydrated with water or a sports drink that offers electrolytes. You will need to replace the electrolytes in your body to help cool off and reset your system.
  3. Stay informed with your areas weather and temperature forecast. If you know that it is going to be an extremely hot day, it would be best to  be prepared.
    • Have a cold non-alcoholic beverage handy.
    • Have a cool towel near to help your body cool off.
    • Try to stay in a shaded area, if at all possible.
  4. If you feel that you are going to be sick due to the heat, stop what you are doing and contact your doctor for help.

There are two main factors that have an effect on you when it comes to extreme heat:

  • High humidity. When the humidity is high, sweat won’t evaporate as quickly, which keeps your body from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.
  • Personal factors. Age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use can play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather.

There are four main groups that are at a higher risk for heat-related illnesses. It is best to monitor these groups of people when they are in your care:

  1. People who are of the age 65 or older.
  2. Children under the age of two years-old.
  3. People with a chronic disease.
  4. People with a mental illness.

Some simple questions to ask them, or make sure of for them are:

  • Are they drinking enough water?
  • Do they have access to air conditioning?
  • Do they need help keeping cool?

Some precautions for not only people at a higher risk of heat-related illnesses, but anyone who will be in the extreme heat are:

  • Find an air-conditioned building. If your home is without air-conditioning, stay in public facilities as much as possible. If your vehicle has air-conditioner, use it as much as possible.
  • Do not only rely on a fan as your primary cooling option. A fan only distributes the hot air to keep it moving, and it is not a source of cool air.
  • Drink as much water as possible, not only when you feel thirsty.
  • Find a “Heat Wave Buddy”. Check in on your buddy, and have them check in on you. Use each other to make sure that you both make it through the extreme heat without a heat-related illness.
  • Try to keep from using the stove or oven in your house to cook. It will only cause you and your house to stay warmer, and not allow anything to cool off.

Even if you are young, healthy and in the best shape of your life, you still run a risk of suffering from a heat-related illness. If at all possible, try not to participate in strenuous physical activities during extreme heat.

  • Try to stay inside during midday when the temperature is the highest. If it is not possible for you to stay indoors, try to keep your physical activities to a minimum.
  • Make sure to have plenty of sunscreen handy, and also reapply as recommended.
  • When participating in activities, start slow. Gradually allow yourself to become accustomed to the heat before going full force into an activity.
  • Drink PLENTY of water / sports drinks throughout the day, even if you are not thirsty at the time. A lack of hydration can lead to muscle cramping, and that may be an early sign of a heat-related illness.
  • Make sure to dress appropriate for the activities you are participating in. Wear loose-fitting clothing that is lightweight and light-colored.

If you play a summer sport, make sure to protect yourself and keep an eye on teammates. If possible:

  • Try to have practices or workouts during the cooler parts of the day. Early morning or later in the afternoon are better choices than midday.
  • Use the “Heat Wave Buddy” system between you and your teammates. Keep each other safe and in line with the safety precautions.
  • Make contact with a doctor or medical provider if you or a teammate has any symptoms of a heat-related illness.
  • There is a CDC course that can help you look for signs of heat-related illnesses.

Here are a few steps, from the CDC, that are good for any and everyone to keep in mind to keep safe in the extreme heat:

  • Stay in an air-conditioned indoor location as much as possible.
  • Drink plenty of fluids even if you don’t feel thirsty.
  • Schedule outdoor activities carefully.
    • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and sunscreen.
    • Pace yourself.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Never leave children or pets in cars.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates.

 

The original article can be found here: CDC Extreme Heat Information

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Weakley County History and Genealogy

In schools, they teach World Civilizations History, American History, and even State History… but never touch upon County History. This can be the most pertinent, valuable, and useful history that we can learn. How much do you know about Weakley County’s history? Answering truthfully, I must confess not much. But in only one afternoon with the Internet, it’s amazing how much I have learned!

Did you know that Weakley County is associated with the ill-fated Donner Party?
Who knew?! I discovered that at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnweakle/, along with much more.


A HISTORY LESSON IS IN ORDER!

Weakley County was established October 21, 1823 from lands ceded by the Chickasaw Indians. Weakley County was named for Colonel Robert Weakley who was at the time Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate. Weakley County is located on the Plateau Slope of West Tennessee, one of the three “Grand Divisions”. Weakley County is bordered on the north by the State of Kentucky, on the east by Henry County, on the South by Carroll and Gibson Counties, and on the west by Obion County. Dresden is the County Seat of Weakley County.

Retrieved from http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnweakle/, the following are United States statistics from the year 1902 – it is hard to believe it has only been a bit over 100 years.

  • The average life expectancy in the US was forty-seven (47).
  • Only 14 Percent of the homes in the US had a bathtub.
  • Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone. A three-minute call from Denver to New York City cost eleven dollars.
  • There were only 8,000 cars in the US and only 144 miles of paved roads.
  • The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.
  • Alabama, Mississippi, Iowa, and Tennessee were each more heavily populated than California.
  • With a mere 1.4 million residents, California was only the 21st most populous state in the Union.
  • The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower.
  • The average wage in the US was 22 cents an hour.
  • The average US worker made between $200 and $400 per year.
  • A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year, a dentist earned $2,500 per year, a veterinarian earned between $1,500 and $4,000 per year, and a mechanical engineer earned about $5,000 per year.
  • More than 95 percent of all births in the US took place at home.
  • Ninety percent of all US physicians had no college education. Instead, they attended medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press and by the government as “substandard.”
  • Sugar cost four cents a pound. Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen.
  • Coffee cost fifteen cents a pound.
  • Most women only washed their hair once a month and used borax or egg yolks for shampoo.
  • Canada passed a law prohibiting poor people from entering the country for any reason.
  • The five leading causes of death in the US were:
    1. Pneumonia and influenza
    2. Tuberculosis
    3. Diarrhea
    4. Heart disease
  • The American flag had 45 stars. Arizona, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Hawaii and Alaska hadn’t been admitted to the Union yet.
  • The population of Las Vegas, Nevada was 30.
  • Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn’t been invented.
  • There were no Mother’s Day or Father’s Day.
  • One in ten US adults couldn’t read or write. Only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated from high school.
  • Eighteen percent of households in the US had at least one full-time servant or domestic.
  • There were only about 230 reported murders in the entire US.

Unbelievable, isn’t it?
It is a wonderful thing that there is so much work done to create and maintain ties to the history of this county as well as state. With the Internet, this sifting process has become much easier.
For more information about Weakley County history and/or genealogy, try these links:

Enjoy learning all that you can about this phenomenal county!
Happy Trails from your friends at the
Weakley County Department of Finance
http://www.weakleycountytn.gov/finance/